MAX // Batsheva Dance Company

31.5.2014. / 19:30 / HNK

MAX

Batsheva Ensemble (IL)

Embraced as one of the most exciting contemporary dance companies in the world, Batsheva Dance Company, under the artistic direction of Ohad Naharin, offers a revolutionary movement language that is distinctive and adventurous. Praised for their fearless, full-bodied, movingly honest performances, Batsheva tours extensively throughout Israel and internationally, focusing on works by Naharin and House Choreographer Sharon Eyal.

There isn’t a moment of rest; it’s a succession of climaxes that leave you at the end of the performance stricken and amazed. To a large extent MAX is a climax of Naharin’s current creative chapter, a perfection and distillation of the search and research laboratory he wandered through in previous works.
Merav Yudilovitch, Ynet

The excellent dancers, whose hypnotizing presence leaves the audience breathless
Gilad Reich, Ahbar on-line

Ohad Naharin’s chamber creation continues exploring and researching the origin and essence of movement. For the first time since its creation, MAX will be performed by the Batsheva Ensemble. Seldom does Naharin contribute a full length piece to the Ensemble dancers, a troupe that has evolved into a professional, self-sufficient, company, with international tours of their own. “The Ensemble dancers form a wonderful group, that I deeply love. MAX enables me to undergo a significant process with it,” says Naharin. The group on stage, allegedly tightly defined, systematically defeats our yearning for identity and recognition mechanisms, because its’ gestures are universal and specific at the same time. Max is a journey into the human spirit, a primal expression of pain and happiness, the solitude of the individual, the essence of the couple, the essence of a team, and of society as a whole.

MAX, re-staged in 2014 for the Batsheva Dance Ensemble, is part of the Batsheva Dance Company Jubilee Year celebrations, and is based on the earlier version which premiered in 2007.

…Choreographer Ohad Naharin’s imagination works overtime as he explores the universal language of movement….In this work, Naharin has created an alter-ego for himself in the person of Maxim Warrat, an international musician whose music sounds like an indecipherable fusion of Hebrew, Arabic, Russian, Latin and Spanish. The music and the movement activate, nourish and serve each other. This is cultural, vocal universalism, which brings our attention back to another universal language: movement.
Ruth Eshel, Haaretz, 5.5. 2014.